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about-brooklyn

Our work this year

RenateThis year presents us with a once in a generation opportunity. Not only will development policy take centre stage during the European Year for Development, but 2015 will see the roll-out of a new development agenda to replace the expiring Millennium Development Goals. The new goals – which will set the development agenda for the next 15 years – provide an opportunity to transform the lives and health prospects millions of young women and girls. Empowering young women and girls to take control of their bodies and health is crucial to increasing economic prosperity and achieving gender equality – and ensuring these girls have access to their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) is a fundamental part of this process.

 

It is a fact that investment in SRHR saves lives and promotes health, cutting the number of maternal deaths and unintended pregnancies, and prevents the spread of deadly diseases. There is still much to do but with your continued support, I am certain we will succeed in empowering women and young people everywhere to achieve their full potential. This is crucial not only for them, but for their communities, and our future generations to come.

Renate Baehr, Executive Director, DSW

Renate full sig use

DOWNLOAD THE 2015 ANNUAL REPORT

 

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OUR VISION

is a world free of poverty, disease, and injustice.

OUR MISSION

is to empower young people and communities in low- and middle-income countries by addressing the issue of population dynamics and by improving health as key to sustainable development.

OUR GOAL

to ensure that those most in need, particularly young people, access high quality sexual and reproductive health and rights information, services and supplies.

 

 

achieving-universal-access-to-srhr

Achieving universal access to SRHR

Millions of women and girls living today in some of the world’s poorest countries do not have access to family planning and modern contraceptives which means that they have no control over the timing and spacing of their births. We work towards reducing this unmet need for family planning by promoting access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information, services, and supplies. Not only does investing in SRHR save lives, it also advances gender equality, youth empowerment, poverty reduction, and human rights. Here is what we are doing to help.

Video

 

Sylvia is 14 years old and lives in Uganda. This short film tracks her hopes and dreams and explores what a difference having access to sexual and reproductive health and rights information, services and supplies can make in helping her reach her true potential.

DSW launches budget studies in East Africa A new resource mobilisation “e-learning” tool

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Project spotlight – GeNext project

The GeNext Uganda project aims at empowering young people in Wakiso and Busia districts in Uganda to make informed choices about family planning and their sexual and reproductive health. Here are some success stories from the project.

Juliana

Juliana

My name is Juliana. I work with Reach a Hand Uganda (RAHU) as a peer educator. I am a GeNext Champion.
Reach a Hand Uganda consists of a dynamic passionate and committed young team who believe in the power and the future of young people.
Read more.

Wandera

Wandera

I have devoted my time to help youth access youth friendly Sexual Reproductive Health (SHR) and Family Planning (FP) services.
I am Wandera O. Simon, a clinical officer at Busia Health Centre IV. I also volunteer at FOC-REV Health Centre III in Lumino Sub County.
Read more.

Stephen

Stephen

My name is Stephen Keith Etyanga, I am a senior 4 student at Kayoro Senior Secondary School and I am a GeNext Youth Champion.
I am a member of Buteba Progressive Youth Association (BUPYA) in Busia District.
Read more

Juliana

Juliana

My name is Juliana. I work with Reach a Hand Uganda (RAHU) as a peer educator. I am a GeNext Champion.
Reach a Hand Uganda consists of a dynamic passionate and committed young team who believe in the power and the future of young people.
Read more.

Wandera

Wandera

I have devoted my time to help youth access youth friendly Sexual Reproductive Health (SHR) and Family Planning (FP) services.
I am Wandera O. Simon, a clinical officer at Busia Health Centre IV. I also volunteer at FOC-REV Health Centre III in Lumino Sub County.
Read more.

Stephen

Stephen

My name is Stephen Keith Etyanga, I am a senior 4 student at Kayoro Senior Secondary School and I am a GeNext Youth Champion.
I am a member of Buteba Progressive Youth Association (BUPYA) in Busia District.
Read more

empowering-young-people-to-improve-their-health-and-socio-economic-status

Empowering young people to improve their health and socio-economic status

DSW’s Youth-to-Youth Initiative(Y2Y) has been established to address the needs of young people aged 10 to 24 in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. To achieve this, DSW works in close cooperation with young people to improve their knowledge of their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), and offers training and counselling on club management, leadership, and entrepreneurship to provide them with the skills and power to lead a self-­determined future. Read more.

global-health-advocacy

Global Health Advocacy

DSW recognises the urgent need for improvements to global health. For this purpose, we focus on the integration of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) as a priority on the international development agenda. We campaign for increased official development assistance (ODA), the introduction of the Financial Transaction Tax, greater aid transparency and effectiveness, increased investment in research and development for diseases of poverty, and the harmonisation of donor practices for effective aid delivery in the health sector.

Video

Let’s Save Lives: Pushing EU support for global health R&D

In October 2014, DSW launched the “Let’s Save Lives” campaign. This six month campaign called for the European Union to step-up and commit financial and political capital to the fight against diseases of poverty through innovation. “Let’s Save Lives” was supported by 17 civil society and private sector organisations across the world and was very successful in mobilising support at the European level. By the closing event of the campaign, it was endorsed by 40 key Members of the European Parliament, the European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation Carlos Moedas, and a host of international development leaders.

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Population and the Environment: DSW’s work in Ehtiopia

Ethiopia’s Bonga Forest, located in the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Region, is rich in wild-growing Arabica coffee. In 2001, DSW launched the Integrated Bonga Forest Project to curb increasing degradation of the forest, improve livelihood opportunities, and address unmet health needs of people who live in communities surrounding the forest. Together with local partners DSW educates participatory forest management groups on the socio-economic benefits of protecting the forest while maintaining the production and marketing of farmers’ quality organic coffee products with international corporate partners. These are their stories.

Story 1

“Before, people didn’t know much about the forest, except to cut it down for land and for trees. Now, this has changed—even the youth discuss the environment.”

Atinafu Abuye

RH and Environment Club Leader

Kasha village

Atinafu is 19 years old and works as a local carpenter in Kasha, his home village. Eight years ago he joined the newly created RH and Environment youth club—one of the project’s first. Youth clubs have between 25 and 40 members—both males and females aged 10-24 years old. The clubs offer a local venue for socialization, entertainment, and also serve an important means of sharing information to their members and others. His club has two goals: to improve the health of his community, and to preserve the forest. Read more.

“Attitude is no longer a problem; there is high acceptance in the community. The real problem is insufficient supplies.”

Emebet Worku

Health Extension Worker

Wodiyo village

At 22 years old, Emebet has been involved with the project for four years already. Living with her parents in Wodiyo village, she has been trained to be a government Health Extension Worker in her home village. Working in a simple, mud-clad health post, her primary tasks are serving maternity packages for young mothers, hosting community outreach activities, and to provide voluntary counselling and testing services. Together with the local youth club, she is involved in many preventive activities among the community; and the youth often refer new interested users to her for treatment. Read more.

Story 2

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“It is my responsibility to ensure the health of the community. So I participate in community activities where we discuss prevention and transmission of HIV & AIDS.”

Mekonen Welde Giorgis

Ethiopian Orthodox Priest

Wodiyo village

Mekonen is the village priest of Wodiyo. As a man of God, he understands that life and children are gifts and he promotes the teachings of the Church on the importance of monogamous relationships and avoiding sex outside of marriage. At the same time, he wants his community to be healthy, but for people to protect themselves from disease they must be aware. He knows the troubles that people face in the village, especially among adolescents—unfortunately, many young people engage in behaviours that make them vulnerable to unwanted pregnancy, STIs, and HIV infection. Read more.

 

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DSW’s Impact in Numbers

DSW is proud of the successes it has achieved in reaching out to young people in East Africa. Our track record in empowering and enabling these young people to take control of their health and futures include:

596965

Young people reached

1500000

Family planning commodities distributed

18

Policy changes supported

10289

Young people trained

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